Registered Dietitian

I trust your body but I don't trust your eating disorder

I trust your body but I don't trust your eating disorder

Recently, I was talking to a client in eating disorder recovery (of note, all of this is being shared with her permission) who reported feeling really frustrated that so many non-diet dietitians are sharing messages on Instagram about trusting your body and having bodily autonomy while also being recommended by her treatment team (myself included) to eat more consistently. “Y’all need to make up your minds” she said (half) jokingly.

And to be fair, I get where she’s coming from. I am one of the many dietitians talking about body trust, body autonomy, and body liberation on social media. So many of us are practically shouting it from the rooftops - because we steadfastly believe in it for everyone, full stop. We believe that everyone gets to make choices about their body, their health care, their food, their movement.

3 reasons to throw away your scale

3 reasons to throw away your scale

A conversation I’ve been having with clients a lot lately (and frankly, have quite a bit) is about the scale. It’s actually become one of the first questions I ask people during their initial assessments - “do you own a scale? What do you do with that information?” Because I find that oftentimes, the scale plays a pretty significant role in a person’s eating disorder or as a trigger for disordered behaviors. And it turns out (as a surprise to probably no one), I am not a huge advocate of having a scale in the house or regularly using a scale in any way. Before we get into it, I want to acknowledge that it is possible to view weight as neutral and if you’re a person who can step on the scale, not judge the outcome, and move on with your day, that’s great (although I might ask what value this brings to your life). But in my experience, the scale brings up a lot for people and doesn’t provide them with much in return. Which is why I decided to craft this piece for all those people who might be feeling like they’re in an unhealthy relationship with their scale. Consider this your permission slip to throw it out. Toss it. Smash it with a hammer.

tuning out January diet culture messaging

tuning out January diet culture messaging

It’s mid-January and unfortunately, the new year diet culture messages haven’t dissipated.If this is your first year (or second or fourth) new year that you’re not signing up for a diet program or gym membership, it can be easy to feel like you’re doing something wrong. Especially with the barrage of advertisements for various diets this time of year, it can feel weird and maybe a little discouraging to be opting out. I wanted to give you a couple quick reminders if you’re feeling totally overwhelmed or defeated by all the diet-focused messaging this time of year.

my post-vacation detox plan

Similar to my last post, this one is inspired by a recent trip I took. At first, I thought how odd it is that they both inspired me to write something here considering I really don’t travel very often- then I realized it’s really not that odd given all the bullshit diet culture ideas I harbored around food and travel, all the articles I used to read about how to “stay on track” while traveling and the best way to detox and reset our bodies when we get home.

So I wanted to share a little bit about how I’m detoxing this week after a weeklong vacation. If you follow me, it will come as no surprise that I find most detoxes and cleanses to be bullshit, forcing you to pay hundreds of dollars for something your liver and kidneys are perfectly capable of doing (even if you do have any issues with renal/liver function, a week of $300 juices is not going to be your cure). There’s no need to cleanse or detox- your body is very well-equipped to rid itself of toxins and absorb nutrients when you eat something. No lemon cayenne fire water is going to make that process any more efficient.